Science Teaching in Schools

Science Teaching in Schools

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The Committee's report examines science and mathematics teaching in secondary schools in England, focusing on the following issues: the take-up of science and mathematics at GCSE and A-level, the provision of careers advice to students, problems in the recruitment and retention of teachers, the quality of teaching methods and the role of continuing professional development. The Committee finds that effective science teaching in schools is essential, both in order to ensure a satisfactory general level of scientific literacy in society, and to enable the next generation of scientists and engineers to progress into higher education and beyond. It argues that the current examination system forces students to study an excessively narrow range of subjects at too early an age, and it recommends that the Government should reconsider the Tomlinson proposals for a broader diploma-based system for 14-19 year old students based on the International Baccalaureate. This would ensure that students receive a more rounded education and are not made to over-specialise before they are able to see the merits of studying science and mathematics. Concerns are also raised about the shortage of science teachers, particularly specialist physics and chemistry teachers, the quality of careers advice in schools, and the importance of practical science in schools.June 2006 Memorandum by OCR THE ADEQUACY OF PROFESSIONAL SUPPORT FOR TEACHERS As an awarding body, OCR offers general and vocational qualifications in the sciences, including Entry Level, GCSE, GCE, and Nationals.

Title:Science Teaching in Schools
Author:Great Britain. Parliament. House of Lords. Science and Technology Committee
Publisher:The Stationery Office - 2006


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