Women in Turmoil

Women in Turmoil

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In this first publication of six plays by the flamboyantly uninhibited author, poet, and playwright Mercedes de Acosta (1893a€“1968), theater historian Robert A. Schanke rescues these lost theatrical writings from the dusty margins of obscurity. Often autobiographical, always rife with gender struggle, and still decidedly stageworthy, Women in Turmoil: Six Plays by Mercedes de Acosta constitutes a significant find for the canon of gay and lesbian drama. In her 1960 autobiography Here Lies the Heart, de Acosta notes that as she was contemplating marriage to a man in 1920, she was qin a strange turmoil about world affairs, my own writing, suffrage, sex, and my inner spiritual development.q The voice in these plays is that of a lesbian in turmoil, marginalized and ignored. Her same-sex desires and struggles for acceptance fueled her writings, and nowhere is that more evident than in the plays contained herein. The women characters struggle with unfulfilling marriages, divorce, unrequited sexual desire, suppressed identity, and a longing for recognition. Of the six plays, only the first two were ever produced. Jehanne da€™Arc (1922) premiered in Paris with de Acostaa€™s lover at the time, Eva Le Gallienne, starring and Norman Bel Geddes designing the set and lights. In 1934, de Acosta adapted it into a screenplay for Greta Garbo, then her lover, but it was never filmed. Portraying rampant anti-Semitism in a small New England town, Jacob Slovak (1923) was performed both on Broadway and in London, with the London production starring John Gielgud and Ralph Richardson. The Mother of Christ (1924) is a long one-act play written for the internationally known actress Eleonora Duse. After Dusea€™s death, several other actresses including Eva Bartok, Jeanne Eagels, and Lillian Gish explored productions of the play. Igor Stravinsky wrote a score, Norman Bel Geddes designed a set, and Gladys Calthrop designed costumes. However, the play was never produced. Her most autobiographical play, World Without End (1925), and her most sensational play, The Dark Light (1926), both unfold through plots of sibling rivalry, incest, and suicide. With overtones of Ibsen, Illusion (1928) continues the themes of de Acostaa€™s previous plays with her rough and seedy cast of characters, but here the playwrighta€™s drama grows to incorporate a yearning for belonging as well as strong elements of class conflict. What notoriety remains associated with de Acosta has less to do with her writing than with her infamous romances with the likes of Greta Garbo, Marlene Dietrich, Isadora Duncan, Alla Nazimova, Eva Le Gallienne, Tamara Karsavina, Pola Negri, and Ona Munson. Through this collection of six powerfully poignant dramas, editor Robert A. Schanke strives to correct myths about Mercedes de Acosta and to restore both her name and her literary achievements to their proper place in history. Robert A. Schanke has authored the original biography, a€œThat Furious Lesbian:a€ The Story of Mercedes de Acosta, also available from Southern Illinois University Press.Jacob Slovak: (Turning on Myra) Youa#39;re not very interested in my homea€” Myra: What do yer expect me ter say about it? ... considerina#39; the way yer received me this evenina#39;a€” Jacob Slovak: You came of your own accorda€” Myra: Oh, now yera#39; re goina#39; ter throw that in my face! ... (He turns and sinks upon the piano stool, his head and arms crashing down upon the keys. ... Jacob Slovak: Myraa€”(Myra drops her head and closes her eyes again.) ... I love youa€”say you love mea€” Myra: I do!

Title:Women in Turmoil
Author:Robert A Schanke
Publisher:SIU Press - 2008-08-18


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